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Friday, 17 February 2017 11:07

Video clips "Life needs connectivity"

"Life needs connectivity- Three love stories" - 3 video clips

& "Life needs connectivity - Beyond mountains"


Frise 3 animaux


Ecological connectivity is needed on land, under water and in the air to safeguard biodiversity for future generations.

  • The three video clips "Life needs connectivity.Three love stories - Ibex, Fish, Vulture" are made by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation,  Building and  Nuclear Safety (Germany ) in partnership with ALPARC, University of Veterinary Medicine of Vienna and Blue! in the frame of the work of the publication " Alpine Nature 2030 - Creating [ecological] connectivity for generations to come " . Video produced by MischiefVisit.

  • The video clip "Life needs connectivity. Beyond mountains" is made by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation,  Building and  Nuclear Safety (Germany) in partnership with ALPARC, Danubeparks Network for protected areas, CNPA - Carpathians Network of protected areas . Video produced by MischiefVisit.

Have a look at these 4 video clips below!

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Published in Resources
Tuesday, 19 September 2017 08:33

Human-Nature Conflicts and how to overcome them

ALPBIONET2030 proposes a first overview of mediation and mitigation strategies for mountain areas

As a first result of the ALPBIONET2030 project, a report on the state of the art of current mitigation and mediation strategies in mountain areas is available. The study, led by Eurac Research, presents a collection of human-nature conflict case studies and mitigation strategies used in the Alps and in other mountain areas with indications on the transferability of results.


Human-wildlife interactions have always been a significant feature of mountain areas. In the last decades, conservation policies, demographic tendencies, ecological and topographic factors have together resulted in an intensification of this phenomenon in the Alps. These interactions of various kinds can have several negative impacts, both on human activities and on biodiversity conservation. Therefore, there is an absolute need to manage them efficiently from a social and ecological point of view in order to enhance cohabitation in a necessarily shared space.


Wildlife management has traditionally focused on reducing damages caused by animals on human activities, and vice versa. However, there is increasing acknowledgment among specialists that the social dimension of human-wildlife conflicts should constantly be taken into account to manage conflicts.


This work presents a sample of existing mitigation and conflict resolution approaches in mountain areas.  It intends to emphasize the necessity to combine multi- and inter-disciplinary methods in order to reach a qualitative and stable level of human-nature coexistence that would enter into the scheme of a well-established ecological connectivity management throughout Alpine areas.


Public response to wildlife presence is namely considered as a prominent factor in the intensity of a conflict and an important area of work that is to be addressed through mediation approaches.


The present report also suggests that this social and recently considered component of the conflict could be the cornerstone for making the so-called conflict an opportunity to stimulate regional development in the Alps. Turning intense human reactions to wildlife presence into positive actions such as ecotourism development based on wildlife presence would be an example of this. For this reason, it would be necessary to first revise our ambition of “conflict resolution” and focus efforts on optimizing the management of human-wildlife interaction. 


ALPBIONET2030 runs from November 2016 to December 2019 and is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund through the Interreg Alpine Space programme (Total budget: 2,637,285 € - 2,241,693 € ERDF grant). ALPARC is lead partner in this project.

alpbionet2030 CMYK

International Forum Immenstadt (D), 28 September 2017, 9.30am – 4pm (7pm)

The conservation, restoration and creation of ecological connectivity are key elements in European and international nature protection policies. Stakeholders from numerous sectors are involved, adapting their daily activities or setting up particular measures to improve ecological connectivity. These activities support the conservation of biodiversity, but they also generate benefits in a regional socio-economic context and therefore contribute to greening the economy.
The GreenConnect project has studied the contributions of ecological connectivity measures to a green economy in the Alpine context and highlighted some of the potential socio-economic impacts. Based on the results of this study, that will be presented during the event, participants from research, Alpine Pilot Regions, administrations and representatives from different economic sectors are invited to discuss the implications, to suggest related project ideas and to participate in the drafting of a follow-up process.

The International Forum takes place in the Alpseehaus in Immenstadt (D) on 28 September 2017.
This event is organized in coordination with the “Business models for the sustainable use of natural resources in the Alpine region” Workshop organized as part of a process to develop an action plan for a Green Alpine Economy, taking place the day before (27th September 2017) in Immenstadt.

A short video to illustrate the importance of cooperation between the Alps and the Carpathians via the flat Danube river plains

Curious to know what happened to our friends the ibex, the bearded vulture and the fish? Want to learn more about the challenge of the red deer in the flat Danube river plains? A fourth short and humorous video clip about the importance of ecological connectivity in a specific geographical context is now being added to the existing series. 

The short video clip that was developed in the frame of the cooperation between the networks of protected areas in the Alps (ALPARC) and the Carpathians (CNPA) and the Danube Protected Areas Network (Danube Parks) illustrates how landscape fragmentation may be a problem for wildlife in the intersection between these three European regions. Will we be able to see another happy ending? Take 2 minutes off and follow our red deer in their quest for love. The video is available on the ALPARC YouTube channel.

 

The beginning of the year was composed of numerous meetings for the ALPBIONET2030 project partners: a partners’ meeting in the Kalkalpen National Park, one of the project working regions, bi- or plurilateral meetings to coordinate the work of the individual Work Packages and an experts’ workshop to define the guideline to re-design the connectivity-mapping-tool JECAMI.

Mapping the results of the project was the central issue of many discussions during this time. The partners now agreed on a methodology and defined the adapted indicators to analyse, identify and map the Strategic Alpine Connectivity Areas (SACA), one of the key objectives of the project.

First data collection, analysis and mapping activities were also carried out concerning the wildlife management approaches of the different Alpine countries and regions.

Finally, a first round of surveys was launched in order to identify the main human-wildlife conflicts also linked to connectivity issues amongst different Alpine stakeholders. A further survey targeting a younger public of students is currently being developed.

The project homepage is now online and offers an interesting overview of the project activities and the advancement of the work: http://www.alpine-space.eu/projects/alpbionet2030/en/home. In addition to the project factsheet (in all Alpine languages) and a poster, a project flyer summarising the main project information will be available soon.

alpbionet2030 CMYK

A sunny day somewhere in the Swiss Engadin valley. Cries and laughter come from a group of usually stressed managers in a medium-sized Swiss company handling unusual tools for them: motor saws, brush cutters, and forks. The group is participating in a “nature day” event, a team building session where they participate in nature protection activities under the supervision of local farmers and biologists. Their activities of clearing meadows from bushes and trees contribute to safeguarding important habitats for specific plants and animals and improving ecological connectivity. The farmers involved in the project benefit from important additional work power and they get paid for hosting and overseeing the activities of the group. 

This example is one of the numerous measures carried out to improve the functional links between habitats by the Alpine Pilot Regions for Ecological connectivity that were presented during the 2 Workshops that took place in the Eastern and Western Alps in March 2017.

The project partners of the GreenConnect project will now analyse in more detail the possible positive socio-economic effects of such activities in the concerned regions. The project should allow a widening of the approach to the topic of ecological connectivity by adding a social and economic dimension to the dialogue and provide additional arguments for the exchanges with the (local) stakeholders.           

The results of this analysis will be presented at the project’s final conference in autumn 2017.

 

At the XIVth Alpine Conference in Grassau (Germany) two new Pilot Regions were nominated by the Alpine Convention: the Achental Region (Germany) and the French part of the Ecoregion Mont Blanc.


The evaluation carried out by the Platform Ecological network of the Alpine Convention on the already existing 8 Pilot Regions has confirmed their valuable contribution to the implementation of a pan-alpine ecological network and their nomination has been confirmed for the upcoming 4 years.

 

Interesting details on the activities of the Pilot Regions can be found on the modules of the exhibition on Alpine Pilot Regions for Ecological Connectivity.

 

 Logo CA site web   Bundesministerium für Umwelt Naturschutz Bau und Reaktorsicherheit Logo.svg
   

The publication “Alpine Nature 2030 - Creating [ecological] connectivity for generations to come” edited in October 2016 gives an overview about twelve years’ experience on ecological connectivity in the Alps and offers interesting perspectives for the evolutions of the upcoming years. Numerous experts and scientists have contributed to this publication. A large number of unpublished maps complete the articles that propose a detailed analysis on various topics such as the link between ecological connectivity and ecosystem services, the alpine Pilot Regions for ecological connectivity, the European and national policies on ecological networks, the cartography of alpine connectivity areas and many more.


This publication is available as open e-paper and can be downloaded as pdf.


Three short videos were realized to promote the publication, explaining in a simple and entertaining way the topic of ecological connectivity to a larger public.


Will the three love stories come to a happy end? Join our fish, ibex and bearded vulture in their quest for love: 
"Life needs connectivity- Three love stories"


Visit our Youtube page and have a look at these 3 video clips!

 

Alpine convention logo German presidency    Bundesministerium für Umwelt Naturschutz Bau und Reaktorsicherheit Logo.svg

Wien, 05.10.2016 (UWD). Die europäischen Naturschutzregelungen Fauna-Flora-Habitat- und Vogelschutzrichtlinie (FFH- und VS-RL) sind Grundlage für die Einrichtung von mittlerweile mehr
als 270 Natura 2000-Gebieten in Österreich. Obwohl die Richtlinien seit 1995 in Österreich in Kraft sind, bestehen immer noch Vorurteile und Ängste, wenn es um die Ausweisung neuer
Gebiete und die Umsetzung von Projekten geht. Einerseits, weil Österreich in der Schutzgebietsausweisung seit Jahren zu den EU-Schlusslichtern zählt und dadurch Verunsicherung
besteht, andererseits, weil diverse Vorurteile – wie etwa wirtschaftliche Benachteiligung durch eine Schutzgebietsausweisung – kursieren. Der Umweltdachverband beauftragte daher im
Rahmen des von EU und Bund geförderten Gemeinschaftsprojekts „gREen.watch“ (Projektpartner BirdLife Österreich und WWF Österreich) die Technische Universität Wien (TU), den Zusammenhang zwischen Natura 2000 und Wirtschaft in einer umfassenden Studie zu erforschen.

Mehr unter: http://www.umweltdachverband.at/inhalt/die-maer-vom-wirtschaftshindernis-natura-2000-aktuelle-studie-schafft-klarheit?ref=89

Vollständige Pressemitteilung auf Deutsch 

Download Studie "Natura 2000 und Wirtschaft"

Published in News from the Alps
Monday, 12 September 2016 14:20

News from members

Two new members

We are glad to welcome 2 new members in our network this year: The Natural Park Ötztal, in Austria and the Friuli Venezia Giulia Autonomous region in Italy

Changes in management

In February 2016, the National Stelvio Park consortium (IT) that managed the park since October 1995, has been dissolved. Since the 1st of March, the park administrative supervision and management has been transferred to the related territories: Autonomous Province of Bolzano and of Trento and Lombardy region. A coordination committee, presided by Ugo Parolo, insures the unity of the park. Wolfgang Platter, director of the former consortium, has retired the 1st of September 2016. Involved for years in the network, he remains ALPARC Council Vice President until the next elections. We already wish him success in his personal projects.

In the French protected areas, several nominations are highlighted

Henriette Martinez, Major of Laragne-Montéglin (Hautes-Alpes), President of the Laragnais Community of Communes, is the new president of the Baronnies Provençales Regional Nature Park, an organisation she has supported since the beginning. This year she was also elected President of the Provence-Alpes-Côte-D’azur Regional Nature Parks network and Vice President of the French Federation of Regional Nature Parks.

As for Eva Aliacar, she has assumed the position of Director of the National Nature Park of Vanoise last July. She is the second woman to manage the Park since its creation and replaces Emmanuel Michau.

Regarding the Nature Park of the Massif des Bauges, it is Jean-Luc Desbois, former deputy director who is now at its head.
 
3 French Alpine National Parks strenghten their cooperation

The presidents and directors of the 3 National Parks of the French Alps (Mercantour, Vanoise, Écrins) are involved to make a joint effort to settle technical cooperation and to look for financings. European financing search for joint actions is one of the most important point of this cooperation. Actions have already been pooled: as regards scientific research, "Lacs sentinelles" and "Alpages sentinelles" programmes that are great examples.